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Link: Kendall Rogers7/13 2:08 PM | IP: Logged
Can you say. "Thank you Mr. Boras, canIhavesomemoreplease".
7/14 10:36 AM | IP: Logged

KNBR this morning talked about it and were saying it was not
a good move.  But no one has a Crystal
Ball and knows what the end results will be both financially or by not getting
into a Pro System quicker so that they can work with his pitching mechanics.
But the end result as of now = he will be at Stanford & pitch on Fridays so
next season it will be my time to get back to watching college baseball in my
favorite college diamond. And while people talk endlessly if he made the right
decision, let them, I know my rear will be out there enjoying some games. 

7/14 11:42 PM | IP: Logged
I don't, for the life of me, understand what type of guidance was provided to Mark during this process.  He had a chance to be the #1 overall pick, if his agent could have been reasonable, and then passed on $3.84M, an increased offer from the Pirates, in the 8th overall slot.  Now he returns to Stanford for his senior season coming off a 10-2 record, the last lost and poor performance undoubtedly caused by the strain of the draft week chaos, with little to prove and a huge loss of leverage.  Mark Appel is a great kid, smart and not defined by baseball.  He will be a success in life with or without baseball, but I just don't understand what Boros is doing.  All of the other first round picks signed and Appel's uniqueness in this regard is not good. 
7/16 4:57 PM | IP: Logged
It's a gutsy move by Mr. Appel and Mr. Boras.  I do not know Mr. Appel and I do not know Mr. Boras but I assume they have good intentions. 

This is simply a business decision, the thought being that next year's draft, at this moment, looks weaker than the 2012 draft.  With another solid season in the lite-hitting Pac-12, perhaps Mr. Appel is the #1 pick in 2013 and will sign for far more $$ than in 2012.

I wish the young man well.
7/17 1:15 PM | IP: Logged
I know both. One of them played for me and the other has represented a few of my guys and his brother is a friend. I will say that this was not a business decision- this was a reaction to going lower than he should have. The reality is that they tested the new Collective Bargaining Agreement with MLB and their players and found that owners stuck to their guns and wouldn't pay higher than "slot" money. I won't say what the offer was that was turned down but I will tell you it was much higher than what the first pick of the draft received. By the way, light-hitting Pac-12? 
7/17 3:31 PM | IP: Logged

I know the details too and they have been reported elsewhere.  He could have gone higher, even number 1 overall.   As for next year, the talk is that the talent pool is better (not sure about at the very top) so that may or may not be an issue for Mark next year.  This was a huge risk and I think unwise.  I hope it turns out well for him, but I question seriously Boros' judgment in this regard and simply wish the best for Mark. 

The Pirates had 2.9M has the slot and were able to cobble together an offer of 3.84M, which shows some appreciation.  Must have been a horrible Friday of agonizing decisions for Mark.  

This post was edited on 7/17 4:54 PM by StillABear1

7/17 4:51 PM | IP: Logged
NCSF, these are ALL business decisions, unless Mr. Appel flat-out did not want to play for the Pirates.  Slot was $3.8M if I recall.  The Pirates, word has it, did not want to pay above slot and incur a tax on the overage.  Instead, they will take the 9th pick in 2013 draft. 

It was obvious the moment Mr. Appel was drafted 8th by the Pirates that he was less than thrilled. 

It sounds like you are privy to information that many of us are not, which I respect.  But whenever you, me or a baseball player has been offered a "contract" it becomes a business decision. 

Based on what I saw in the CWS, yes, I believe the Pac-12 is lite-hitting based on what Florida State did to Stanford's vaunted pitching staff in the Super Regional, among other reasons.
7/17 4:53 PM | IP: Logged


The light hitting Pac 12 did win the CWS this year! The SEC league batting average was .276 while the light hitting Pac 12 was hitting .287. 

Back to Appel, according to the link below he turned down 6 million from the Astros. 


http://peerreviewedbymyneurons.wordpress.com/2012/07/14/keith-law-is-wrong-about-the-mlb-draft-but-his-critique-teaches-an-important-lesson-about-public-policy/

This post was edited on 7/17 6:25 PM by thatch62

7/17 6:17 PM | IP: Logged
Here's my point- It wasn't about turning down the eighth pick offer. It was turning down what he was offered in the first pick slot. It was a few million less than and the advisor (agent) could not possibly justify taking what was offered when he turned down a few million more initially. The agent took a gamble on being able to beat the new Collective Bargaining Agreement "slot money" and lost the bet. Pure and simple. The business decision was spinning the wheel and betting teams would cave.

Finally, did you watch the World Series? Did U of A look light (not lite) hitting? They hit .329 as a team. Stanford hit .292. and hit more HR's than your vaunted Florida State. ACC standout South Carolina hit about .260 as a team. UCLA hit .304. ASU hit .293. Cal also hit .293 as a team. Oregon State hit .281. "Gorilla Ball" LSU hit .285. Sorry, the Pac 12 plays the best baseball year-in and year-out- period! Just look at the draft.

7/18 12:31 AM | IP: Logged


I completely understand your point, but why let Boros jeopardize your financial future by his selfish act of trying to beat the CBA.   The slot money was $7.2M, he was offered $6.0M.  Using a 35% overall tax rate and a 5% agency payment to Boros, the net difference is about 0.7M and, personally, I think unjust to lead a young man to forego net compensation of approx 3.6M which is an unbelievably incredible way to start life and huge insurance in case he doesn't make the majors, which is highly probable statistically.  He also loses a year 'in the system" with little to gain, from a draft perspective, by returning to Stanford. 



I can actually understand from Boros' perspective why they then turned down the money from the Pirates saving face, but poor Mark, who could have had approx 2.3M net  to start his professional life.  His opportunity, and a rare one at that, to gain unusual wealth was put at risk because this high profile, often unreasonable and surely selfish, agent wanted to beat the CBA???  

7/18 11:48 AM | IP: Logged


StillABear1,


Ditto. And as of right now (going forward) there are no guarantees

7/18 2:42 PM | IP: Logged
The agent's goal of getting as much as he can for his players is fine...but not at expense of progressing the player's career.
Appel needs to get into the pro system and progress...  if the goal is a long/successful pro career,  why delay the process in key years....  sure,  less so if Appel was a HS Sr who is 18 years old ...   Appel is a poker chip in Boras suite of players...  that used to make a point to MLB teams...  if that means a set back to Appel's career, so be it... (from Boras perspective).
.....  not that playing a 4th year/being a student at Stanford is a bad thing....  but is not the move I would have advised for him to do...
10/28 9:52 AM | IP: Logged
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